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spit – Wiktionary

spit - Wiktionary

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

The noun is from Center English spit, spite, spete, spette, spyte, spytte (rod on which meat is cooked; rod used as a torture instrument; quick spear; level of a spear; backbone within the fin of a fish; pointed object; dagger image; land projecting into the ocean), from Previous English spitu (rod on which meat is cooked; spit),[1] from Proto-Germanic *spitō (rod; skewer; spike), *spituz (rod on which meat is cooked; stick), from Proto-Indo-European *spid-, *spey- (sharp; sharp stick). The English phrase is cognate with Danish spid, Dutch spit, German Low German Spitt (pike, spear; spike; skewer; spit), Swedish spett (skewer; spit; sort of crowbar).

The verb is derived from the noun,[2] or from Center English spiten (to placed on a spit; to impale), from spit, spite: see above.[3] The English phrase is cognate with Center Dutch speten, spitten (trendy Dutch speten), Center Low German speten (Low German spitten, trendy German spießen (to skewer, to spear), spissen (now dialectal)).[2]

Noun[edit]

spit (plural spits)

  1. A skinny metallic or picket rod on which meat is skewered for cooking, usually over a fireplace.
    Synonym: broach
    • 1793, G. Hamilton, “[Appendix to the Tenth Volume of the Monthly Review Enlarged.] A Quick Description of Carnicobar”, in The Month-to-month Evaluate; or, Literary Journal, Enlarged, quantity X, London: Printed for R[alph] Griffiths; and offered by T[homas] Becket, [], OCLC 901376714, web page 509:

      They roaſt a fowl, by working a chunk of wooden by it, by the use of ſpit, and holding it over a briſk fireplace, till the feathers are burnt of, when it’s prepared for consuming, of their taſte.

    • 1793, Arthur Younger, “1788 [chapter]”, in Travels throughout the Years 1787, 1788 and 1789, Undertaken Extra Significantly with a View of Ascertaining the Cultivation, Wealth, Sources, and Nationwide Prosperity of the Kingdom of France. [] In Two Volumes, quantity I, Dublin: Printed for Messrs. R. Cross, [], OCLC 1003870295, web page 192:

      An Engliſh household within the nation, […] would obtain you with an unquiet hoſpitality, and an anxious politeneſs; and after ready for a hurry-ſcurry derangement of material, desk, plates, ſideboard, pot and ſpit, would provide you with maybe ſo good a dinner, that not one of the household, between anxiousness and fatigue, might ſupply one phrase of converſation, and you’ll depart underneath cordial wiſhes that you just may by no means return.—This folly, ſo frequent in England, isn’t met with in France: […]

    • 1817, [William Kitchiner], “Roasting”, in Apicius Redivivus; or, The Prepare dinner’s Oracle: [], London: Printed for Samuel Bagster, [], by J. Moyes, [], OCLC 606082028:

      When the joint to be roasted is thicker at one finish than the opposite, place the spit slanting, in order that the entire time the thickest half is nearest the hearth, and in addition the thinnest by this implies is preserved from being overmuch roasted.

    • 1950, James Hornell, “The Biggest Eel-farm and Eel-trap within the World”, in Fishing in Many Waters, 1st paperback version, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire: On the College Press, revealed 2014, →ISBN, web page 166:

      The spits upon which the double sections of fish are transfixed are iron rods about 7 toes lengthy, supplied with an L-shaped deal with at one finish, in order that when held on a bracket at both facet of the hearth it might be turned by hand.

  2. A usually low, slender, pointed, normally sandy peninsula.
    • 1843, William W[illiams] Mather, “Marine Alluvial Detritus”, in Geology of New-York (Pure Historical past of New York; half 4), half I (Comprising the Geology of the First Geological District), Albany, N.Y.: Printed by Carroll & Prepare dinner, [], OCLC 642659056, web page 28:

      Sand-spits are unfinished seashores, and lengthy tongues or factors of land, fashioned of sand and shingle, by the transporting motion of currents and the waves. In Coldspring harbor, a sand-spit extends from the west shore, obliquely, almost throughout. […] The supplies are transported by the currents and waves, and deposited to type this spit.

    • 1874, Robert Louis Stevenson, “Ordered South”, in Virginibus Puerisque and Different Papers, London: C[harles] Kegan Paul & Co., [], revealed 1881, OCLC 504702577, web page 147:

      Or maybe he might even see a bunch of washerwomen relieved, on a spit of shingle, towards the blue sea, […]

    • 2016, Robert C. Graham and A. Toby O’Geen, “Geomorphology and Soils”, in Harold Mooney and Erika Zavaleta, editors, Ecosystems of California, Oakland, Calif.: College of California Press, →ISBN, half 1 (Drivers), web page 63, column 1:

      Playa margins are dominated by relict shoreline options, similar to wave-cut terraces, depositional seashore ridges, and offshore bars and spits.

Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

spit (third-person singular easy current spits, current participle spitting, easy previous and previous participle spitted)

  1. (transitive) To impale on a spit; to pierce with a pointy object.

    to spit a loin of veal

    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Lifetime of Henry the Fift”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In accordance with the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iii], web page 79, column 1:

      [W]hy in a second looke to ſee / The blind and bloody Souldier, with foule hand / Deſire the Locks of your ſhrill-ſhriking Daughters: / Your Fathers taken by the ſiluer Bears, / And their moſt reuerend Heads daſht to the Partitions: / Your bare Infants ſpitted vpon Pykes, / Whiles the mad Moms, with their howles confus’d, / Doe breake the Clouds, […] / What ſay you? Will you yeeld, and thus auoyd? / Or guiltie in defence, be thus destroy’d.
    • 1991, I. F. La Croix; E. A. S. La Croix; T. M. La Croix, “Malaŵi: Local weather and Geography”, in Orchids of Malaŵi: The Epiphytic and Terrestrial Orchids from South and East Central Africa, Rotterdam; Brookfield, Vt.: A[ugust] A[imé] Balkema, →ISBN, web page 4, column 2:

      Fried or roast mice, spitted on sticks like kebabs, are sometimes provided on the market by the roadside.

    • 2012, Hilary Mantel, “Falcons: Wiltshire, September 1535”, in Carry Up the Our bodies, London: Fourth Property, →ISBN, half 1:

      [H]e has seen kitchens thrown into turmoil, and he himself has been down within the grey-green hour earlier than daybreak, when the brick ovens are swabbed out prepared for the primary batch of loaves, as carcasses are spitted, pots set on trivets, poultry plucked and jointed.

  2. (transitive) To make use of a spit to prepare dinner; to take care of meals that’s cooking on a spit.

    She’s spitting the roast within the kitchen.

    • 2005, Gary Alan Wassner, chapter 36, in The Twins, Port Orchard, Wash.: Windstorm Artistic, →ISBN; republished London: Gateway, 2014, →ISBN:

      [H]e noticed that the fires scattered all around the huge camp have been emitting greasy fumes from the carcasses of the burning animals spitted over the flames.

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

The verb is from Center English spē̆ten, spete (to spit (blood, phlegm, saliva, venom, and so forth.); of a hearth: to emit sparks), from Previous English spǣtan (to spit; to squirt);[4] or from Center English spit, spitte, spitten (to spit (blood, phlegm, saliva, venom, and so forth.); of a hearth: to emit sparks), from Previous English spittan, spyttan (to spit),[5][6] each from Proto-Germanic, from Proto-Indo-European *sp(y)ēw, *spyū,[7] finally imitative; examine Center English spitelen (to spit out, expectorate)[8] and English spew.[9] The English phrase is cognate with Danish spytte (to spit), North Frisian spütte, Norwegian spytte (to spit), Swedish spotta (to spit), Previous Norse spýta (Faroese spýta (to spit), Icelandic spýta (to spit)).[6]

The noun is derived from the verb;[10] examine Danish spyt (spit), Center English spit, spitte (saliva, spittle, sputum),[11]spet (saliva, spittle),[12]spē̆tel (saliva, spittle),[13]North Frisian spiit.[10]

Verb[edit]

spit (third-person singular easy current spits, current participle spitting, easy previous and previous participle spat or spit)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To evacuate (saliva or one other substance) from the mouth, and so forth.
    Synonym: expectorate
    • 1682, Thomas Otway, Venice Preserv’d, or, A Plot Uncover’d. A Tragedy. [], London: Printed for Jos[eph] Hindmarsh [], OCLC 664400715, Act III, scene i, web page 23:

      Aquil[ina]. […] pray what Beast will your Worship please to be subsequent? / Anto[nio]. Now I’l be a Senator agen, and thy Lover little Nicky Nacky! [He sits by her.] Ah toad, toad, toad, toad! spit in my Face a bit, however a bit bit—spit in my Face prithee, spit in my Face, by no means so little: […]

    • 1974, James A[lbert] Michener, “Drylands”, in Centennial, New York, N.Y.: Random Home, →ISBN; Dial Press commerce paperback version, New York, N.Y.: Dial Press, 2015, →ISBN, web page 931:

      When the mighty duststorm, silent and terrifying, first engulfed her, she thought she would choke. Spitting mud from her dry lips, she ran indoors to guard the youngsters, and located them coughing.

    • 1994, Stephen Fry, chapter 2, in The Hippopotamus, London: Hutchinson, →ISBN, web page 25; republished London: Arrow Books, Random Home Group, 1995, →ISBN, pages 39–40:

      On the very second he cried out, David realised that what he had run into was solely the Christmas tree. Disgusted with himself at such cowardice, he spat a needle from his mouth, stepped again from the tree and listened. There have been no sounds of any motion upstairs: no shouts, no sleepy grumbles, solely a mild tinkle from the decorations because the tree had recovered from the collision.

    • 2020 October 21, “Community Information: Stomach Mujinga”, in Rail, web page 11:

      The 47-year-old had allegedly been spat at by a passenger at London Victoria who mentioned he had the virus, though a subsequent police investigation concluded that there was inadequate proof to cost anybody.

  2. (transitive, intransitive) To emit or expel in a fashion just like evacuating saliva from the mouth; particularly, to rain or snow barely.

    a scorching pan spitting droplets of fats

    • 1834 October, “Boz” [pseudonym; Charles Dickens], “The Steam Tour”, in Sketches by “Boz,” Illustrative of Each-day Life, and Each-day Individuals. In Two Volumes, quantity II, 2nd version, London: John Macrone, [], revealed 1836, OCLC 912950347, web page 310:

      It had been “spitting” with rain for the final half-hour, and now it started to pour in good earnest.

    • 1851 December 24, Henry David Thoreau, “December, 1851 (Æt[atis] 34)”, in Bradford Torrey, editor, The Writings of Henry David Thoreau: Journal, quantity III (September 16, 1851 – April 30, 1852), Boston, Mass.; New York, N.Y.: Houghton Mifflin and Firm, revealed 1906, OCLC 84133896, web page 153:

      It spits snow this afternoon. Noticed a flock of snowbirds on the Walden street. I see them so generally when it’s starting to snow that I’m inclined to treat them as an indication of a snow-storm.

    • 2015 Could, James Axler [pseudonym; Rik Hoskin], chapter 6, in Hell’s Maw (Outlanders; 73), Don Mills, Ont.: Gold Eagle Books, Worldwide Library, →ISBN, web page 73:

      The wag zigzagged throughout the sphere, bumping over ruts within the soil and tangled grass as a stream of bullets adopted them from the high-mounted railguns, spitting sparks from the metallic sides of the wag.

  3. (transitive, intransitive) To utter (one thing) violently.
    • 2004, Mark Gatiss, “The Thriller of the Two Geologists”, in The Vesuvius Membership: A Little bit of Fluff (A Lucifer Field Novel), New York, N.Y.: Simon & Schuster, →ISBN; republished New York, N.Y.: Pocket Books, 2005, →ISBN, web page 23:

      Gentleman? You?” he spat.

  4. (transitive, slang, hip-hop) To rap, to utter.
  5. (intransitive) To make a spitting sound, like an indignant cat.
Utilization notes[edit]

The previous tense and previous participle spit is an older type, however stays the extra frequent type utilized by audio system in North America, and can be used usually sufficient by audio system of British and Commonwealth English to be listed instead type by the Collins English Dictionary and Oxford Dictionaries. A non-standard previous participle type is spitten.

Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

spit (countable and uncountable, plural spits)

  1. (uncountable) Saliva, particularly when expectorated.
    Synonyms: expectoration, spittle

    There was spit all around the washbasin.

    • 2010, Connie Colwell Miller, “How Spit Occurs”, in The Slimy Guide of Spit (The Amazingly Gross Human Physique), Mankato, Minn.: Edge Books, Capstone Press, →ISBN, web page 19:

      Generally your physique does not make as a lot spit because it wants. Once you sleep, your salivary glands take a little bit of a nap too. You are still making spit, however not as a lot. This is the reason your mouth feels dry whenever you get up.

  2. (countable) An occasion of spitting; particularly, a light-weight fall of rain or snow.
    • 2015, Col Buchanan, “Return of the King”, in The Black Dream, London: Tor Books, →ISBN:

      It was early winter within the southern continent, a season of rain and winds and dust, and certainly coals in a close-by brazier hissed with a couple of spits of rain.

  3. An individual who precisely resembles another person (normally in set phrases; see spitting picture)
    • 2011, Kate Konopicky, “Worn-Out Genes”, in A Lady Of No Significance: A Tenderly Noticed, Ruthlessly Trustworthy and Hilariously Humorous Memoir in regards to the Joys and Horrors of Motherhood, Ebury Publishing:

      A lot of folks claimed she was the picture of her father (about the identical quantity who noticed her because the useless spit of her mom), which was a bit disconcerting.

  4. (uncountable) Synonym of slam (card sport)
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under must be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Etymology 3[edit]

The noun is from Center Dutch speet, spit, Center Low German spêdt, spit (Low German spit); the phrase is cognate with Dutch spit, North Frisian spatt, spet, West Frisian spit.[14]

The verb is from Center English spitten (to dig), from Previous English spittan (to dig with a spade),[15] presumably from spitu (rod on which meat is cooked; spit); see additional at etymology 1. The English phrase is cognate with Center Dutch spetten, spitten (trendy Dutch spitten), Center Low German speten, spitten (Low German spitten), North Frisian spat, West Frisian spitte.[16]

Noun[edit]

spit (plural spits)

  1. The depth to which the blade of a spade goes into the soil when it’s used for digging; a layer of soil of the depth of a spade’s blade.
    • 1791 January 10, Samuel Dunn, Transactions of the Society Instituted at London for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce; [], quantity IX, London: Printed by T. Spilsbury and Son, []; and offered by Messrs. [James] Dodsley, [], OCLC 1015453113, web page 42:

      They [the potatoes] ſtood until October, once they have been taken up, and a big pye manufactured from them; which is laying them up in a heap, and overlaying them with ſtraw and a ſpit of earth.

    • 1792 January 1, Lewis Majendie, Transactions of the Society Instituted at London for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce; [], quantity X, London: Printed by T. Spilsbury and Son, []; and offered by Messrs. [James] Dodsley, [], OCLC 1015453113, web page 4:

      The firſt plantation, containing 4 thouſand ſix hundred oaks, was fashioned on a part of the traditional Dwelling Park, ſurrounding this Caſtle: the ſoil was dug one full ſpit, and the turf inverted; […]

    • 1832, “Horticulture”, in David Brewster, editor, The Edinburgh Encyclopædia, […] In Eighteen Volumes, quantity X, 1st American version, Philadelphia, Pa.: Printed by Joseph and Edward Parker. [], OCLC 38367204, web page 545, column 1:

      Soil of the standard depth could also be trenched two spit (spadeful) deep; and if that is performed each third 12 months, it’s evident that the floor which has produced three crops will relaxation for the following three years; thus giving a a lot better probability of regularly producing wholesome and luxuriant crops, and with one half the manure that will in any other case be requisite.

    • [2006], NIIR Board of Consultants & Engineers, “Manufacturing and Administration of Medicinal Vegetation on Farms”, in Cultivation and Processing of Chosen Medicinal Vegetation, Delhi: Asia Pacific Enterprise Press, →ISBN, web page 82:

      Proceed as for the one dig however begin by eradicating two spits of topsoil to the far diagonal nook and in addition one spit of subsoil. Flip the uncovered subsoil from gap two into gap one. Incorporate natural matter.

  2. The quantity of soil {that a} spade holds; a spadeful.
    • 1795 March, Ezra L’Hommedieu, “Observations on Manures”, in Transactions of the Society, for the Promotion of Agriculture, Arts and Manufactures, Instituted within the State of New-York, quantity I, 2nd revised version, Albany, N.Y.: Printed by Charles R. and George Webster, [], revealed 1801, OCLC 519802182, half III (Transactions, &c.), web page 235:

      Dig your clay with a ſpade in ſpits of abnormal bricks; dig two, three, eight, ten or twenty a great deal of clay, extra or leſs as you pleaſe; […] then take theſe ſpits of clay, after they’re tried within the ſun, ſurround your pile of wooden with them, […]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

spit (third-person singular easy current spits, current participle spitting, easy previous and previous participle spitted)

  1. (transitive, dialectal) To dig (one thing) utilizing a spade; additionally, to show (the soil) utilizing a plough.
    • 1769, “PLOUGH”, in The Full Farmer: Or, A Basic Dictionary of Husbandry in All Its Branches; [], 2nd corrected and improved version, London: Printed for R. Baldwin, [], OCLC 723457287, column 2:

      [T]he double plough, by taking faſt maintain of the mould, throws all again once more; and if the greens should not effectually earthed up, which could be the caſe after double ſpitting the intervals, then working the double plough over once more, completes the buſineſs, and ſtrangely toſſes about and mellows the mould.

  2. (transitive, dialectal) To plant (one thing) utilizing a spade.
    • 1882 Could, J. Alexander Fulton, “Delaware Peach Orchards”, in Joseph H. Reall, editor, Agricultural Evaluate and Journal of the American Agricultural Affiliation, quantity 2, quantity 2, New York, N.Y.: Agricultural Evaluate Firm, [], OCLC 5764181, web page 124:

      When the [peach] seed is procured it’s both “spitted in” with a spade or planted in rows within the nursery.

  3. (intransitive, dialectal) To dig, to spade.
    Synonym: delve
    • 1758 September 2–5, “A Course of Experiments and Enhancements in Agriculture, []”, in The London Chronicle: Or, Common Night Publish, quantity IV, quantity 263, London: Bought by J. Wilkie, [], OCLC 37438463, web page 219, column 1:

      We left the bottom, of subject of loam, by ſuppoſition underneath two ſorts of managements; the one half very tough, and the opposite made as nice as circumſtances would permit; the previous ploughed the uſual depth, the opposite double ſpitted; […]

    • 1882 Could, J. Alexander Fulton, “Delaware Peach Orchards”, in Joseph H. Reall, editor, Agricultural Evaluate and Journal of the American Agricultural Affiliation, quantity 2, quantity 2, New York, N.Y.: Agricultural Evaluate Firm, [], OCLC 5764181, web page 124:

      Then the bottom is “spitted” or spaded in about six or eight inches deep, as a backyard is for a crop of greens.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “spit(e, n.(1)” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019; examine “spit, n.1”, in OED On-line Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford College Press, 1914, and “spit” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford College Press.
  2. 2.02.1 “spit, v.1”, in OED On-line Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford College Press, 1914.
  3. ^ “spiten, v.(1)” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019.
  4. ^ “spē̆ten, v.” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019.
  5. ^ “spitten, v.(1)” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 21 March 2019.
  6. 6.06.1 “spit, v.2”, in OED On-line Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford College Press, 1914.
  7. ^ John Ayto (1990) Dictionary of Phrase Origins, New York, N.Y.: Arcade Publishing, →ISBN.
  8. ^ “spitelen, v.” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019, derived from Center English spitten.
  9. ^ “spit” in Douglas Harper, On-line Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.
  10. 10.010.1 “spit, n.2”, in OED On-line Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford College Press, 1914.
  11. ^ “spit(te, n.” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019, derived from spitten (to spit).
  12. ^ “spet, n.” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019, derived from spē̆ten (to spit).
  13. ^ “spē̆tel, n.” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019.
  14. ^ “spit, n.3”, in OED On-line Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford College Press, 1914.
  15. ^ “spitten, v.(2)” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019.
  16. ^ “spit, v.3”, in OED On-line Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford College Press, 1914.

Additional studying[edit]

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg rotisserie on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg spit (landform) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg spitting on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg spit (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • James Orchard Halliwell (1847) , “SPIT”, in A Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Phrases, Out of date Phrases, Proverbs, and Historic Customs, from the Fourteenth Century. […] In Two Volumes, quantity II (J–Z), London: John Russell Smith, [], OCLC 1008510154, web page 785, column 1: “SPIT. (1) The depth a spade goes in digging, a few foot.”

Anagrams[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Center Dutch spit. This etymology is incomplete. You’ll be able to assist Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this time period.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

spit n (plural spitten or speten, diminutive spitje n or speetje n)

  1. A skewer.
    Synonyms: braadspit, vleesspies, vleesspit

Associated phrases[edit]


Ternate[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English velocity.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

spit

  1. speedboat, motorboat

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive research of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, College of Pittsburgh, web page 30

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English velocity.

Noun[edit]

spit

  1. velocity

Westrobothnian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center Low German spīt. Examine Previous Norse spé, Norwegian spit, English spite, Dutch spijt. See additionally spej.

Noun[edit]

spit m

  1. Spite, defiance.
    Han åt int na i spit’n

    In defiance he ate nothing.
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Previous Norse *spítr, from Proto-Germanic *spihtiz. Cognate with Previous Norse spéttr, spætr, from *spihtaz, *spehtaz. Examine riit from *rihtijaną and witer from *wihtiz.

Noun[edit]

spit m

  1. (in compounds) Woodpecker.
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

spit m

  1. Capability.
Declension[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]

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