AchillesGames

hit – Wiktionary

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English hitten (to hit, strike, make contact with), from Outdated English hittan (to satisfy with, encounter, fall in with), from Outdated Norse hitta (to strike, meet), from Proto-Germanic *hittijaną (to return upon, discover), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂eyd- (to fall; fall upon; hit; lower; hew).

Cognate with Icelandic hitta (to satisfy), Danish hitte (to search out), Latin caedō (fall), Albanian qit (to hit, throw, pull out, launch).

Verb[edit]

hit (third-person singular easy current hits, current participle hitting, easy previous hit or (dialectal, out of date) hat or (uncommon, dialectal) het, previous participle hit or (archaic, uncommon, dialectal) hitten)

  1. (heading, bodily) To strike.
    1. (transitive) To manage a blow to, straight or with a weapon or missile.

      One boy hit the opposite.

      • 1879, R[ichard] J[efferies], chapter II, in The Beginner Poacher, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], OCLC 752825175:

        Orion hit a rabbit as soon as; however although sore wounded it obtained to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the facet of the opening and was drawn out. Certainly, a nail filed sharp is just not of a lot avail as an arrowhead; it’s essential to have it barbed, and that was just a little past our ability.

      • 1922-1927, Frank Harris, My Life and Loves
        He tried to hit me however I dodged the blow and went out to plot revenge.
      • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[[Episode 15]]”, in Ulysses, London: The Egoist Press, revealed October 1922, OCLC 2297483:

        Bello: (Shouts) Good, by the rumping leaping normal! That is the perfect bit of reports I heard these six weeks. Right here, do not maintain me ready, rattling you! (He slaps her face)
        Bello: (Whimpers) You are after hitting me. I will inform []

      • 1934, Robert E. Howard, The Slugger’s Recreation
        I hunted him for half a hour, aiming to be taught him to hit a person with a table-leg after which run, however I did not discover him.
    2. (transitive) To return into contact with forcefully and instantly.

      The ball hit the fence.

      • a dozen apples, every of them close to as massive as a Bristol barrel, got here tumbling about my ears; one among them hit me on the again as I chanced to stoop, and knocked me down flat on my face.
      • 1882, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Physician Grimshawe’s Secret: A romance
        In the meantime the road boys stored up a bathe of mud balls, a lot of which hit the Physician, whereas the remaining had been distributed upon his assailants.
    3. (intransitive) To strike in opposition to one thing.
      • a. 1705, John Locke, “An Examination of P[ère] Malebranche’s Opinion of Seeing All Issues in God”, in Posthumous Works of Mr. John Locke: [], London: [] A[wnsham] and J[ohn] Churchill, [], revealed 1706, OCLC 6963663:

        If our bodies be extension alone, [] how can they transfer and hit one in opposition to one other?
    4. (transitive) To activate a button or key by urgent and releasing it.

      Hit the Enter key to proceed.

    5. (transitive, slang) To kill an individual, often on the directions of a 3rd occasion.

      Hit him tonight and throw the physique within the river.

      • 1973, Mario Puzo, Francis Ford Coppola, The Godfather Half II (screenplay, second draft)
        FREDO: Mikey, why would they ever hit poor outdated Frankie 5-Angels? I cherished that ole sonuvabitch.
    6. (transitive, navy) To assault, particularly amphibiously.

      If intelligence had been what it ought to have been, I do not assume we might ever have hit that island.

  2. (transitive) To handle to the touch (a goal) in the appropriate place.
    I hit the jackpot.
    Antonym: miss
  3. (transitive, colloquial) To change on.
    Antonyms: lower, kill
    Someone’s been right here! Hit the lights!
  4. (transitive, colloquial) To briefly go to.

    We hit the grocery retailer on the best way to the park.

  5. (transitive, casual) To come across an impediment or different problem.

    You may hit some nasty thunderstorms for those who descend too late.We hit a variety of site visitors getting back from the flicks.

  6. (heading) To achieve, to attain.
    1. (transitive, casual) To achieve or obtain.

      The film hits theaters in December.

      The temperature might hit 110°F tomorrow.

      We hit Detroit at one within the morning however stored driving via the night time.

      • 2012, August 1. Owen Gibson in Guardian Limitless, London 2012: rowers Glover and Stanning win Group GB’s first gold medal:
        And her success with Glover, a product of the Nationwide Lottery-funded Sporting Giants expertise identification programme, will even spark aid amongst British officers who had been beginning to fret just a little about hitting their goal of equalling fourth within the medal desk from Beijing.
    2. (intransitive) To fulfill or attain what was geared toward or desired; to succeed, usually by luck.
      • c. 1604–1605, William Shakespeare, “All’s VVell, that Ends VVell”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene i]:

        And oft it hits / The place hope is coldest and despair most matches.

      • 1733, Jonathan Swift, On Poetry, a Rhapsody
        Tens of millions miss for one which hits.
    3. To guess; to mild upon or uncover.
      • c. 1590–1592, William Shakespeare, “The Taming of the Shrew”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene i]:

        Thou hast hit it.

  7. (transitive) To have an effect on negatively.

    The economic system was hit by a recession.  The hurricane hit his fishing enterprise onerous.

  8. (figurative) To assault.
    • 2016 March 3, Nick Gass, quoting Donald Trump, “Trump on small arms: ‘I assure you there is not any downside’”, in Politico[1]:

      I’ve to say this, he hit my arms. No person has ever hit my arms. I’ve by no means heard of this one. Take a look at these arms. Are they small arms?

  9. (heading, video games) To make a play.
    1. (transitive, card video games) In blackjack, to deal a card to.

      Hit me.

    2. (intransitive, baseball) To return as much as bat.

      Jones hit for the pitcher.

    3. (backgammon) To take up, or exchange by a bit belonging to the opposing participant; stated of a single unprotected piece on some extent.
  10. (transitive, computing, programming) To make use of; to hook up with.

    The exterior internet servers hit DBSRV7, however the inner internet server hits DBSRV3.

  11. (transitive, US, slang) To have intercourse with.

    I would hit that.

  12. (transitive, US, slang) To inhale an quantity of smoke from a narcotic substance, significantly marijuana.
    • 2005, Jordan Houston, Darnell Carlton, Paul Beauregard, Premro Smith, Marlon Goodwin, David Brown, and Willie Hutchinson (lyrics), “Keep Fly”, in Most Recognized Unknown[2], Sony BMG, carried out by Three 6 Mafia (that includes Younger Buck, Eight Ball, and MJG):

      Tastes like fruit once you hit it; obtained to have bread to get it.

Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
  • (handle to the touch in the appropriate place): miss
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Noun[edit]

hit (plural hits)

  1. A blow; a punch; a placing in opposition to; the collision of 1 physique in opposition to one other; the stroke that touches something.
    The hit was very slight.
  2. One thing very profitable, similar to a music, movie, or online game, that receives widespread recognition and acclaim.
    • 2012 February 9, Tasha Robinson, “Movie: Overview: Chico & Rita”, in (Please present the guide title or journal identify)[3]:

      Chico & Rita opens within the fashionable period, as an aged, weary Chico shines sneakers in his native Cuba. Then a music heard on the radio—a hit he wrote and recorded with Rita of their youth—carries him again to 1948 Havana, the place they first met.

  3. An assault on a location, particular person or individuals.
  4. A collision of a projectile with the goal.
    1. Within the recreation of Battleship, an accurate guess at the place one’s opponent ship is.
  5. (computing, Web) A match discovered by looking out a pc system or search engine
  6. (Web) A measured go to to a web page, a request for a single file from an internet server.
    My website obtained twice as many hits after being listed in a search engine.
  7. An roughly appropriate reply in a take a look at set.
  8. (baseball) The entire play, when the batter reaches base with out the good thing about a stroll, error, or fielder’s alternative.
    The catcher obtained a hit to guide off the fifth.
  9. (colloquial) A dose of an unlawful or addictive drug.
    The place am I going to get my subsequent hit?
  10. A premeditated homicide finished for felony or political functions.
  11. (dated) A peculiarly apt expression or flip of thought; a phrase which hits the mark.
    a cheerful hit
  12. (backgammon) A transfer that throws one of many opponent’s males again to the coming into level.
  13. (backgammon) A recreation received after the adversary has eliminated a few of his males. It counts for lower than a gammon.
Antonyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Adjective[edit]

hit (not comparable)

  1. Very profitable.
    The band performed their hit music to the delight of the followers.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center English hit (it), from Outdated English hit (it), from Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe-, *ḱey- (this, right here). Cognate with Dutch het (it). Extra at it. Word ‘it.

Pronoun[edit]

hit (subjective and goal hit, reflexive and intensive hitself, possessive adjective and noun hits)

  1. (dialectal) It.
    • 1922, Philip Gengembre Hubert, The Atlantic month-to-month, Quantity 130:
      However how hit was to return about did not seem.
    • 1998, Nancy A. Walker, What’s so humorous?: humor in American tradition:
      Now, George, grease it good, an’ let hit slide down the hill hits personal approach.
Derived phrases[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Alemannic German[edit]

Various kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated Excessive German hiutu, from hiu +‎ tagu, a calque of Latin hodie. Cognate with German heute, Dutch heden.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

hit

  1. (Alsatian) right this moment

    Hit isch dr Jean-Pierre so drüri.Jean-Pierre is so unhappy right this moment.


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English hit.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hit m (plural hits)

  1. hit (one thing very profitable)
    Synonym: èxit
    • 2020 February 6, Time Out Barcelona[4], quantity 583, web page 8, column Sèries:

      Us passareu els capítols amb el Shazam obert buscant els hits que sonen.

      You may spend the episodes with Shazam open, trying to find the hits that play.

References[edit]


Chamorro[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(i-)kita, from Proto-Austronesian *(i-)kita. Doublet of ta.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hit

  1. we, us (inclusive)

Utilization notes[edit]

See additionally[edit]

References[edit]

  • Donald M. Topping (1973) Chamorro Reference Grammar[5], Honolulu: College of Hawaii Press.

Etymology[edit]

From English hit.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hit m

  1. hit (a hit, particularly within the leisure business)
    Synonym: šlágr

Etymology[edit]

From English hit.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hit n (singular particular hittet, plural indefinite hit or hits)

  1. hit (one thing very profitable)

Inflection[edit]

Additional studying[edit]


Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English hit.

Noun[edit]

hit m (plural hits, diminutive hitje n)

  1. A hit music, a extremely popular and profitable music.
  2. (by extension) Successful, one thing in style and profitable (particularly within the leisure business).
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortening of Hitlander (Shetlander).

Noun[edit]

hit m (plural hitten, diminutive hitje n or hitske n)

  1. (dated) A Shetland pony.
  2. (dated, regional) Any pony or small horse.
Derived phrases[edit]

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From hisz (to imagine).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hit (plural hitek)

  1. religion, perception
  2. (archaic) oath, phrase of honour (e.g. in hitves and hitet tesz)

Declension[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

(Expressions):

Additional studying[edit]

  • hit in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

hit

  1. right here

Determiner[edit]

hit

  1. this

References[edit]

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[6], Chiang Mai: Payap College (grasp thesis).

Limburgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch hit, from English hit.

Noun[edit]

hit f

  1. (slang, Dutch) one thing in style (guide, music, band, nation)

Utilization notes[edit]

Slang. Primarily used when talking Dutch, slightly than in actual Limburgish. General talking, Limburgish is extra conservative, subsequently slaag is extra usually used.

Inflection[edit]

Inflection
Root singular Root plural Diminutive singular Diminutive plural
Nominative hit hits hitje hitjes
Genitive hit hits hitjes hitjes
Locative hittes hitteser hitteske hitteskes
Dative¹²
Accusative¹²
  • Dative and accusative are these days out of date, use nominative as a substitute.
  • The dative obtained out of use round 1900. As it is a latest loanword, there isn’t any conjugation for it to be discovered.

Center Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hit

  1. Various type of het

Center English[edit]

Various kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated English hit, from Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe-, *ḱey- (this, right here).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hit (accusative hit, genitive hit, his, possessive determiner hit, his)

  1. Third-person singular neuter pronoun: it
  2. Generally utilized in reference to a baby or man: he, she
  3. Third-person singular neuter accusative pronoun: it
  4. Third-person singular neuter genitive pronoun: its
  5. (impersonal, placeholder) Third-person singular impersonal placeholder pronoun: it

Descendants[edit]

Determiner[edit]

hit (nominative pronoun hit)

  1. Third-person singular neuter possessive determiner: it

References[edit]


Min Nan[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adverb[edit]

hit

  1. right here (to this place)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

hit

  1. right here (to this place)

References[edit]


Outdated Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hit.

Pronoun[edit]

hit

  1. it

Various kinds[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Center Dutch: het
    • Dutch: het (solely the pronoun; the particular article is a weakened type of dat)
    • Limburgish: hèt

Additional studying[edit]

  • “hit”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Outdated English[edit]

Various kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe-, *ḱey- (this, right here). Cognate with Outdated Frisian hit (it), Outdated Excessive German iz (it), Gothic (hita, it). Extra at .

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hit n (accusative hit, genitive his, dative him)

  1. it

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Outdated Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See the etymology of the primary entry.

Article[edit]

hit

  1. neuter nominative/accusative singular of hinn

Declension[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From English hit.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hit m inan

  1. hit (a hit, particularly within the leisure business)

Declension[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

  • hit in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • hit in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English hit.

Noun[edit]

hit m (plural hits)

  1. hit (success, particularly within the leisure business)
    Synonym: sucesso

Additional studying[edit]

  • “hit” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English hit.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hit m (plural hits)

  1. hit (success)
    Synonym: éxito

Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Outdated Swedish hit, from *+at.

Composed in an analogous approach: Icelandic hegat and hingað.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

hit (not comparable)

  1. right here; to this place, hither
    Jag kom hit igår

    I got here right here yesterday
Antonyms[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
See additionally[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English hit.

Noun[edit]

hit c

  1. (casual) hit; one thing extremely popular. (A guide, a film, a music, …)

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