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case – Wiktionary

obscene - Wiktionary

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Center English cas, from Previous French cas (an occasion), from Latin casus (a falling, a fall; accident, occasion, prevalence; event, alternative; noun case), good passive participle of cado (to fall, to drop).

Noun[edit]

case (plural circumstances)

  1. An precise occasion, scenario, or reality.

    For a change, on this case, he was telling the reality.

    It’s not the case that each unfamiliar phrase is an idiom.

    In case of fireplace, break glass. [sign on fire extinguisher holder in public space]

    • 2013 July 20, “The assault of the MOOCs”, in The Economist, quantity 408, quantity 8845:

      For the reason that launch early final yr of […] two Silicon Valley start-ups providing free training by MOOCs, large open on-line programs, the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations. College manufacturers in-built some circumstances over centuries have been compelled to ponder the chance that info know-how will quickly make their current enterprise mannequin out of date.

  2. (now uncommon) A given situation or state.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.10:
      Ne wist he the way to turne, nor to what place: / Was by no means wretched man in such a wofull cace.
    • 1726, Nathan Bailey, John Worlidge, Dictionarium Rusticum, Urbanicum & Botanicum
      Mares that are over-fat, maintain with a lot issue; whereas these which might be however in good case and plump, conceive with the best readiness and ease.
  3. A bit of labor, particularly outlined inside a occupation.

    It was one of many detective’s best circumstances.  Social employees ought to work on a most of forty energetic circumstances.  The physician informed us of an fascinating case he had handled that morning.

    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, in The Celeb:

      We drove again to the workplace with some concern on my half on the prospect of so massive a case. Sunning himself on the board steps, I noticed for the primary time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke.

    • 1927, F. E. Penny, chapter 4, in Pulling the Strings:

      The case was that of a homicide. It had a component of thriller about it, nevertheless, which was puzzling the authorities. A turban and loincloth soaked in blood had been discovered; additionally a workers. These properties have been identified to have belonged to a toddy drawer. He had disappeared.

  4. (academia) An occasion or occasion as a subject of examine.

    The educating consists of idea classes and case research.

  5. (regulation) A authorized continuing, lawsuit.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 2, in The Tremarn Case[1]:

      “Two or three months extra glided by ; the general public have been eagerly awaiting the arrival of this semi-exotic claimant to an English peerage, and sensations, surpassing these of the Tichbourne case, have been appeared ahead to with palpitating curiosity. […]”

  6. (grammar) A particular inflection of a phrase relying on its operate within the sentence.

    The accusative case canonically signifies a direct object.  Latin has six circumstances, and remnants of a seventh.

    • 1988, Andrew Radford, chapter 6, in Transformational grammar: a primary course, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge College Press, web page 292:

      Now, the Topic of both an indicative or a subjunctive Clause is all the time assigned Nominative case, as we see from:
      (16) (a)   I do know [that they/*them/*their leave for Hawaii tomorrow]
      (16) (b)   I demand [that they/*them/*their leave for Hawaii tomorrow]
      Against this, the Topic of an infinitive Clause is assigned Goal case, as we see from:
      (17)   I would like [them/*they/*their to leave for Hawaii tomorrow]
      And the Topic of a gerund Clause is assigned both Goal or Genitive case: cf.
      (18)   I do not like the concept of [them/their/*they leaving for Hawaii tomorrow]
  7. (grammar, uncountable) Grammatical circumstances and their meanings taken both as a subject typically or inside a particular language.

    Jane has been learning case in Caucasian languages.  Latin is a language that employs case.

  8. (drugs) An occasion of a particular situation or set of signs.

    There have been one other 5 circumstances reported in a single day.

  9. (programming) A piece of code representing one of many actions of a conditional change.
    • 2004, Rick Miller, C++ for Artists:

      Place a break assertion on the finish of each case to stop case fall-through.

    • 2011, Stephen Prata, C++ Primer Plus, web page 275:

      Execution doesn’t mechanically cease on the subsequent case.

Synonyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Verb[edit]

case (third-person singular easy current circumstances, current participle casing, easy previous and previous participle cased)

  1. (out of date) To suggest hypothetical circumstances.

See additionally[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center English cas, from Previous Northern French casse, (evaluate Previous French chasse (field, chest, case)), from Latin capsa (field, bookcase), from capiō (to take, seize, maintain). Doublet of money.

Noun[edit]

case (plural circumstances)

  1. A field that comprises or can comprise a variety of equivalent gadgets of manufacture.
  2. A field, sheath, or protecting usually.
    a case for spectacles; the case of a watch
  3. A bit of baggage that can be utilized to move an equipment comparable to a stitching machine.
  4. An enclosing body or casing.
    a door case; a window case
  5. A suitcase.
  6. A bit of furnishings, constructed partially of clear glass or plastic, inside which gadgets may be displayed.
  7. The outer protecting or framework of a chunk of equipment comparable to a pc.
  8. (printing, historic) A shallow tray divided into compartments or “bins” for holding sort, historically organized in units of two, the “higher case” (containing capitals, small capitals, accented) and “decrease case” (small letters, figures, punctuation marks, quadrats, and areas).
  9. (typography, by extension) The character of a chunk of alphabetic sort, whether or not a “capital” (higher case) or “small” (decrease case) letter.
  10. (poker slang) 4 of a form.
  11. (US) A unit of liquid measure used to measure gross sales within the beverage trade, equal to 192 fluid ounces.
  12. (mining) A small fissure which admits water into the workings.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Knight to this entry?)
  13. A skinny layer of tougher steel on the floor of an object whose deeper steel is allowed to stay mushy.
  14. A cardboard field that holds (often 24) beer bottles or cans.
    Synonym: carton
Hyponyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.
References[edit]

Adjective[edit]

case (not comparable)

  1. (poker slang) The final remaining card of a selected rank.
    He drew the case eight!
    • 2006, David Apostolico, Classes from the Skilled Poker Tour (web page 21)
      If he did have an even bigger ace, I nonetheless had at the least six outs — the case ace, two nines, and three tens. I might even have extra outs if he held something lower than A-Ok.
References[edit]

Verb[edit]

case (third-person singular easy current circumstances, current participle casing, easy previous and previous participle cased)

  1. (transitive) To put (an merchandise or gadgets of manufacture) right into a field, as in preparation for cargo.
  2. (transitive) To cowl or shield with, or as if with, a case; to surround.
    • 1856-1858, William H. Prescott, Historical past of the Reign of Philip II
      The person who, cased in metal, had handed complete days and nights within the saddle.
  3. (transitive, casual) To survey (a constructing or different location) surreptitiously, as in preparation for a theft.
    • 1977, Michael Innes, The Homosexual Phoenix, →ISBN, web page 116:
      You’re within the grounds of Brockholes Abbey, a home into which an excessive amount of helpful property has simply been moved. And your job is to case the joint for a break in.
    • 2014, Amy Goodman, From COINTELPRO to Snowden, the FBI Burglars Communicate Out After 43 Years of Silence (Half 2), Democracy Now!, January 8, 2014, 0:49 to 0:57:
      Bonnie labored as a daycare director. She helped case the FBI workplace by posing as a university pupil concerned about changing into an FBI agent.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

casé

  1. (transitive) hit

Conjugation[edit]

References[edit]

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[2], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis), web page 263

Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

case

  1. first-person singular current subjunctive of casar
  2. third-person singular current subjunctive of casar

Chinese language[edit]

Various types[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English case.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

case

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) case (clarification of this definition is required)

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin casa, within the sense of “hut, cabin”. The opposite senses are a semantic mortgage from Spanish casa. Doublet of chez, which was inherited.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

case f (plural circumstances)

  1. (archaic, uncommon or regional) hut, cabin, shack
  2. field (on kind)
  3. sq. (on board sport)

Derived phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quasi (as if).

Adverb[edit]

case

  1. nearly

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

case f

  1. plural of casa

Anagrams[edit]


Decrease Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡sasɛ/, [ˈt͡sasə]

Noun[edit]

case

  1. nominative/accusative plural of cas

Center Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Dutch *kāsi, from late Proto-West Germanic *kāsī, borrowed from Latin cāseus.

Noun[edit]

câse m or n

  1. cheese

Inflection[edit]

This noun wants an inflection-table template.

Various types[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Additional studying[edit]


Previous French[edit]

Noun[edit]

case m (indirect plural circumstances, nominative singular circumstances, nominative plural case)

  1. (grammar) case

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

case

  1. first-person singular (eu) current subjunctive of casar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, additionally used with você and others) current subjunctive of casar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative crucial of casar
  4. third-person singular (você) detrimental crucial of casar

Romanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

case

  1. plural of casă

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

case

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) crucial type of casar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) current subjunctive type of casar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) current subjunctive type of casar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, additionally used with usted?) current subjunctive type of casar.

Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

case

  1. plural of casa

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