AchillesGames

burn – Wiktionary

burn - Wiktionary

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English bernen, birnen, from Outdated English birnan (to burn), metathesis from Proto-West Germanic *brinnan, from Proto-Germanic *brinnaną (to burn), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenw- (evaluate Center Irish brennim (drink up), bruinnim (bubble up)), current stem from *bʰreu-, *bʰru- (evaluate Center Irish bréo (flame), Albanian burth (Cyclamen hederifolium, mouth burning), Sanskrit भुरति (bhurati, strikes rapidly, twitches, fidgets)). Extra at brew.

Noun[edit]

burn (countable and uncountable, plural burns)

  1. A bodily damage brought on by warmth, chilly, electrical energy, radiation or caustic chemical compounds.
    She had second-degree burns from falling within the bonfire.
  2. A sensation resembling such an damage.
    chili burn from consuming scorching peppers
  3. The act of burning one thing with fireplace.
    They’re doing a managed burn of the fields.
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 2, in Inner Combustion[1]:

      One typical Grecian kiln engorged one thousand muleloads of juniper wooden in a single burn.

  4. (slang) An intense non-physical sting, as left by disgrace or an efficient insult.
  5. (slang) An efficient insult, typically within the expression sick burn (glorious or badass insult).
  6. Bodily sensation within the muscle mass following strenuous train, brought on by build-up of lactic acid.
    One and, two and, maintain shifting; really feel the burn!
  7. (uncountable, Britain, mainly jail slang) Tobacco.
    • 2002, Tom Wickham, “A Day In The Improper Life”, in Julian Broadhead, Laura Kerr, editor, Jail Writing[2], Sixteenth Version version, Waterside Press, →ISBN, web page 26:

      TOM: I’m critical bruv. Put my burn and lighter and all that in my denims please and provides them right here, then press the cell bell.

    • 2006, S. Drake, A Cry for Assist[3], Chipmunkapublishing ltd, →ISBN, Chapter 7, web page 94:

      “Any of you need to borrow some burn,” requested a scarred inmate often known as Bull.

    • 2006, Peter Squires, editor, Group Security: Crucial Views on Coverage and Observe[4], Coverage Press, →ISBN, web page 23:

      It was like nobody was searching for me, and the older youngsters used to take the piss …they had been all the time threatening me and taking my burn [tobacco] []

    • 2010, Stephen Fry, The Fry Chronicles:

      Because the jail week ended and the much less cautious inmates started to expire of burn they went by a peculiar begging ritual that I, by no means one to husband assets both, was fast to be taught.

  8. (computing) The writing of knowledge to a everlasting storage medium like a compact disc or a ROM chip.
    • 2003, Maria Langer, Mac OS X 10.2 Superior (web page 248)
      Permit extra burns allows you to create a multisession CD, which can be utilized once more to write down extra knowledge.
  9. The operation or results of burning or baking, as in brickmaking.
    They’ve a superb burn.
  10. A illness in greens; model.
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under should be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Verb[edit]

burn (third-person singular easy current burns, current participle burning, easy previous and previous participle burned or (largely Commonwealth) burnt)

  1. (transitive) To trigger to be consumed by fireplace.

    He burned his manuscript within the fire.

    • 2013 June 29, “Unspontaneous combustion”, in The Economist, quantity 407, quantity 8842, web page 29:

      Because the mid-1980s, when Indonesia first started to clear its bountiful forests on an industrial scale in favour of profitable palm-oil plantations, “haze” has turn out to be an nearly annual incidence in South-East Asia. The most cost effective solution to clear logged woodland is to burn it, producing an acrid cloud of foul white smoke that, carried by the wind, can cowl a whole bunch, and even hundreds, of sq. miles.

  2. (intransitive) To be consumed by fireplace, or in flames.

    He watched the home burn.

    • 2013 July 20, “Welcome to the plastisphere”, in The Economist, quantity 408, quantity 8845:

      Plastics are energy-rich substances, which is why lots of them burn so readily. Any organism that would unlock and use that power would do properly within the Anthropocene. Terrestrial micro organism and fungi which may handle this trick are already acquainted to specialists within the subject.

  3. (transitive) To overheat in order to make unusable.

    He burned the toast. The blacksmith burned the metal.

  4. (intransitive) To turn out to be overheated to the purpose of being unusable.

    The grill was too scorching and the steak burned.

  5. (transitive) To make or produce by the applying of fireside or burning warmth.

    to burn a gap;  to burn letters right into a block

  6. (transitive) To injure (an individual or animal) with warmth or chemical compounds that produce related harm.

    She burned the kid with an iron, and was jailed for ten years.

  7. (transitive, surgical procedure) To cauterize.
  8. (transitive, intransitive) To sunburn.

    She forgot to placed on sunscreen and burned.

  9. (transitive) To eat, injure, or change the situation of, as if by motion of fireside or warmth; to have an effect on as fireplace or warmth does.

    to burn the mouth with pepper

    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, “The Life and Demise of King Iohn”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In keeping with the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene iii]:

      This tyrant fever burns me up.

    • 1681, John Dryden, The Spanish Fryar
      This dry sorrow burns up all my tears.
    • 1965, Amplified Bible, James 4:2
      You’re jealous and covet [what others have] and your needs go unfulfilled; [so] you turn out to be murderers. [To hate is to murder as far as your hearts are concerned.] You burn with envy and anger and are usually not capable of acquire [the gratification, the contentment, and the happiness that you seek], so that you struggle and warfare. You wouldn’t have, as a result of you don’t ask.
  10. (intransitive) To be scorching, e.g. as a consequence of embarrassment.

    The kid’s brow was burning with fever.  Her cheeks burned with disgrace.

  11. (chemistry, transitive) To trigger to mix with oxygen or different lively agent, with evolution of warmth; to eat; to oxidize.

    A human being burns a specific amount of carbon at every respiration.  to burn iron in oxygen

  12. (chemistry, dated) To mix energetically, with evolution of warmth.

    Copper burns in chlorine.

  13. (transitive, computing) To write down knowledge to a everlasting storage medium like a compact disc or a ROM chip.

    We’ll burn this program onto an EEPROM one hour earlier than the demo begins.

  14. (transitive, slang) To betray.

    The informant burned him.

  15. (transitive, slang) To insult or defeat.

    I simply burned you once more.

  16. (transitive) To waste (time); to waste cash or different assets.

    We now have an hour to burn.

    The corporate has burned greater than one million {dollars} a month this yr.

  17. In sure video games, to method close to to a hid object which is sought.

    You are chilly… heat… scorching… you are burning!

  18. (intransitive, curling) To unintentionally contact a shifting stone.
  19. (transitive, card video games) In pontoon, to swap a pair of playing cards for one more pair, or to deal a useless card.
  20. (images) To extend the publicity for sure areas of a print with the intention to make them lighter (evaluate dodge).
  21. (intransitive, physics, of a component) To be transformed to a different factor in a nuclear fusion response, particularly in a star
  22. (intransitive, slang, card video games, playing) To discard.
  23. (transitive, slang) To shoot somebody with a firearm.
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under should be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Center English burn, bourne, from Outdated English burne, burna (spring, fountain), from Proto-Germanic *brunnô, *brunō. Cognate with West Frisian boarne, Dutch bron, German Brunnen; additionally Albanian burim (spring, fountain), Historic Greek φρέαρ (phréar, properly, reservoir), Outdated Armenian աղբիւր (ałbiwr, fount). Doublet of bourn. Extra at brew.

Noun[edit]

burn (plural burns)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland) A stream.
    • 1881, Gerard Manley Hopkins, “Inversnaid”, in Robert Bridges, editor, Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins: Now First Revealed [], London: Humphrey Milford, revealed 1918, OCLC 5093462, stanza 1, web page 53:

      This darksome burn, horseback brown, / His rollrock highroad roaring down, / In coop and in comb the fleece of his foam / Flutes and low to the lake falls residence.

    • 1881, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginibus Puerisque:
      He might pitch on some tuft of lilacs over a burn, and smoke innumerable pipes to the tune of the water on the stones.
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, web page 105:
      When it was too heavy rain the burn ran very excessive and huge and ye might by no means soar it.
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • “burn” in Douglas Harper, On-line Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.
  • Webster’s Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967
  • Northumberland Phrases, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4

Noun[edit]

burn

  1. wooden

References[edit]


Etymology[edit]

Center English bourne, from Outdated English burne, burna (spring, fountain).

Cognate with West Frisian boarne, Dutch bron, German Brunnen; additionally Albanian burim (spring, fountain), Historic Greek φρέαρ (phréar, properly, reservoir), Outdated Armenian աղբիւր (ałbiwr, fount).

Noun[edit]

burn (plural burns)

  1. A small river.
    • 1792, Robert Burns, The lea-rig:

      Down by the burn the place scented birks / Wi’ dew are hangin clear, my jo,

      (please add an English translation of this quote)

References[edit]

“burn” within the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.


Related posts

Leave a Comment