AchillesGames

ball – Wiktionary

ball - Wiktionary

English[edit]

Commons

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English bal, ball, balle, from Previous English *beall, *bealla (spherical object, ball) or Previous Norse bǫllr (a ball), each from Proto-Germanic *balluz, *ballô (ball), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰoln- (bubble), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to blow, inflate, swell). Cognate with Previous Saxon ball, Dutch bal, Previous Excessive German bal, ballo (German Ball (ball); Ballen (bale)). Associated varieties in Romance are borrowings from Germanic. See additionally balloon, bale.

Noun[edit]

ball (countable and uncountable, plural balls)

  1. A stable or hole sphere, or roughly spherical mass.

    a ball of spittle; a fecal ball

    1. A amount of string, thread, and so on., wound right into a spherical form.

      a ball of wool; a ball of twine

    2. (ballistics, firearms) A stable, spherical nonexplosive missile for a cannon, rifle, gun, and so on.
      1. A jacketed non-expanding bullet, usually of army origin.
      2. (uncountable, out of date) Such bullets collectively.
        • 1659, Arthur Annesley, 1st Earl of Anglesey, England’s Confusion, London, p. 7,[1]
          [] the Good Previous Trigger, which, as they appeared to characterize it, smelt of Gunpowder and ball []
        • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe, London: W. Taylor, p. 294,[2]
          I gave every of them a Musket with a Firelock on it, and about eight Prices of Powder and Ball, charging them to be superb Husbands of each, and to not use both of them however upon pressing Event.
        • 1803, Robert Charles Dallas, The Historical past of the Maroons, London: Longman and Rees, Quantity 1, Letter 5, p. 148,[3]
          [] some headstrong Maroons have been utilizing a soldier of Captain Craskell’s in poor health, and compelling him to put in writing to his commander, that it was too late to do any factor good, and that they wished nothing, having received loads of powder and ball []
    3. A roundish protuberant portion of some a part of the physique.

      the ball of the thumb; the ball of the foot

    4. (anatomy) The entrance of the underside of the foot, simply behind the toes.
    5. The globe; the earthly sphere.
    6. (arithmetic) The set of factors in a metric area mendacity inside a given distance (the radius) of a given level; particularly, the homologue of the disk in a Euclidean area of any variety of dimensions.
    7. (arithmetic, extra typically) The set of factors in a topological area mendacity inside some open set containing a given level; the analogue of the disk in a Euclidean area.
    8. An object, typically spherical, used for taking part in video games.
      • 2011 October 2, Aled Williams, “Swansea 2-Zero Stoke”, in BBC Sport Wales:

        Graham secured victory with 5 minutes left, coolly lifting the ball over Asmir Begovic.

  2. (sports activities) A spherical or ellipsoidal object.
    1. Any sport or sport involving a ball.

      The youngsters have been taking part in ball on the seashore.

      The youngsters have been taking part in ball within the backyard.

      George performed his faculty ball at Stanford.

    2. (baseball) A pitch that falls outdoors of the strike zone.
    3. (pinball) A possibility to launch the pinball into play.

      In the event you get to 1,000,000 factors, you get one other ball.

    4. (cricket) A single supply by the bowler, six of which make up an over.
    5. (soccer) A go; a kick of the soccer in the direction of a teammate.
      • 2010 December 29, Chris Whyatt, “Chelsea 1-Zero Bolton”, in BBC:

        After Essien’s poor try flew into the stands, Rodrigo Moreno – Bolton’s on-loan winger from Benfica who was making his full Premier League debut – almost uncovered the Blues with a stunning ball for Johan Elmander, however it simply skipped away from his team-mate’s toes.

  3. (mildly vulgar, slang, normally within the plural) A testicle.
    1. (within the plural) Nonsense.

      That’s a load of balls, and you understand it!

    2. (within the plural) Braveness.

      I doubt he’s received the balls to let you know off.

  4. (printing, historic) A leather-covered cushion, mounted to a deal with referred to as a ballstock; previously utilized by printers for inking the shape, then outmoded by the curler.
  5. (farriery, historic) A big tablet, a type by which drugs was given to horses; a bolus.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of White to this entry?)
Synonyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]

(stable or hole sphere):

(testicle):

Translations[edit]
The translations beneath must be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Verb[edit]

ball (third-person singular easy current balls, current participle balling, easy previous and previous participle balled)

  1. (transitive) To type or wind right into a ball.
    to ball cotton
  2. (metalworking) To warmth in a furnace and type into balls for rolling.
  3. (transitive, vulgar) To have sexual activity with.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To collect balls which cling to the ft, as of damp snow or clay; to collect into balls.
    The horse balls; the snow balls.
  5. (slang, normally in current participle) To be hip or cool.
  6. (nonstandard, slang) To play basketball.
  7. (transitive) To punish by affixing a ball and chain
    • 1865, Camp Sumpter, Andersonville Nationwide Historic Web site, Guidelines and Rules of the Jail
      any man refusing to do police obligation might be punished by the sergts by balling him the remainder of the day.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ball

  1. (Australian guidelines soccer) An enchantment by the gang for holding the ball towards a tackled participant. That is heard virtually any time an opposition participant is tackled, with out regard as to whether the principles about “prior alternative” to eliminate the ball are fulfilled.
    • 2007, “Legal guidelines Of The Afl 2007”, in AFL Sydney Swans Guidelines Zone[4], archived from the unique on March 22, 2008:

      deal with (and a few unhealthy ones) will carry a cry of “Ball!” from the gang – a plea for a holding the ball free kick.

Etymology 2[edit]

From French bal, from Late Latin ballō.

Noun[edit]

ball (plural balls)

  1. A proper dance.
  2. (casual) A really pleasing time.

    I had a ball at that live performance.

Synonyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French bal (a dance)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ball m (plural balls)

  1. dance
  2. ball, formal dance

Synonyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]


Crimean Tatar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French balle (ball).

Noun[edit]

ball

  1. estimation, rating

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[5], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French bal (a dance)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ball n (genitive singular balls, nominative plural böll)

  1. dance

Declension[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Previous Irish ball, from Proto-Celtic *ballos, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to blow, swell, inflate); examine English ball, Greek φαλλός (phallós, penis).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ball m (genitive singular baill, nominative plural baill)

  1. (anatomy) organ
  2. element half
  3. member
  4. article
  5. spot, place
  6. spot, mark
  7. (units) ingredient, member

Declension[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

  • an ball is mó ar deireadh (final however not least)
  • ar an mball (instantly, on the spot)
  • ar ball, ar ball beag (a (little) whereas in the past; after a (little) whereas; presently)
  • ar fud an bhaill (in every single place)
  • baill bheatha m pl (vitals)
  • baill dho-laghdaithe (irreducible parts)
  • baill ghiniúna m pl (genitals, reproductive organs)
  • baill inmheánacha m pl (inner organs)
  • baill scoite m (discrete members)
  • ball acra m, ball uirlise m (implement)
  • ball airtléire m (piece of artillery)
  • ball breac m (mottle)
  • ball broinne m (birthmark)
  • ball dearg m (strawberry mark)
  • ball dobhráin m (mole (on pores and skin))
  • ball dóite m (burn)
  • ball dúchais m (congenital mark)
  • ball éadaigh m (article of clothes)
  • ball easpach m (faulty article)
  • ball éisteachta m (listening to organ, ear)
  • ball fearga m (penis)
  • ball fo-éadaigh m (undergarment)
  • ball gréine m (sun-spot)
  • ball inbhéartach m (inverse ingredient)
  • ball ionannais m (identification ingredient)
  • ball nimhneach m (sore spot)
  • ball oibre m (spell of labor)
  • ballra m (members)
  • ball seirce m (love spot, patch)
  • ball séire m (bungler; idiot)
  • ball súiche m (smut)
  • ball tosaigh (báid) m (stempiece (of boat))
  • ball trasna (cross-member)
  • ball trioc m (article of furnishings)
  • ball troscáin m (article of furnishings; family appurtenance)
  • i lár baill (proper within the center, within the centre)
  • i mball éigin (someplace)
  • i mball eile (elsewhere)
  • in aon bhall (in a single place, collectively; on the identical time)
  • i ngach aon bhall (in every single place)
  • i ngach aon treo baill (in all instructions, in every single place)
  • láithreach baill (on the spot, immediately)
  • ó bhall go submit (from stem to stern)

 

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
ball bhall mball
Observe: A few of these varieties could also be hypothetical. Not each attainable mutated type of each phrase really happens.

References[edit]

  • “ball” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “ball”, in eDIL: Digital Dictionary of the Irish Language

Center English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Previous English *beall.

Noun[edit]

ball

  1. Various type of bal

Etymology 2[edit]

Most likely from Previous French bale.

Noun[edit]

ball

  1. Various type of bale (bale)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Previous Norse bǫllr.

Noun[edit]

ball m (particular singular ballen, indefinite plural baller, particular plural ballene)

  1. ball (stable or hole sphere)
  2. ball (object, normally spherical, used for taking part in video games)
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French bal.

Noun[edit]

ball n (particular singular ballet, indefinite plural ball or baller, particular plural balla or ballene)

  1. ball (formal social event involving dancing)
Derived phrases[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Previous Norse bǫllr.

Noun[edit]

ball m (particular singular ballen, indefinite plural ballar, particular plural ballane)

  1. a ball (stable or hole sphere)
  2. a ball (object, normally spherical, used for taking part in video games)
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French bal.

Noun[edit]

ball n (particular singular ballet, indefinite plural ball, particular plural balla)

  1. ball (formal social event involving dancing)
Derived phrases[edit]

References[edit]


Previous Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *ballos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ball m

  1. a physique half
  2. member of a bunch
  3. half, portion
  4. a coloured spot

Declension[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Twin Plural
Nominative ball ballL baillL
Vocative baill ballL baulluH
Accusative ballN ballL baulluH
Genitive baillL ball ballN
Dative baullL ballaib ballaib
Preliminary mutations of a following adjective:

  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Previous Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
baill baill
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
mbaill
Observe: A few of these varieties could also be hypothetical. Not each
attainable mutated type of each phrase really happens.

Additional studying[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Irish ball m (limb, member, organ; member of neighborhood; half, portion, piece; article, object; place, spot; passage (of a guide); spot, mark, blemish) (examine Irish ball), from Proto-Celtic *ballo-, from Proto-Indo-European *bhel- (to blow, swell, inflate) (examine English ball, Historical Greek φαλλός (phallós, penis)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ball m (genitive singular buill, plural buill)

  1. ball
  2. member (of a bunch)
  3. article, merchandise
  4. (anatomy) organ; limb

Derived phrases[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
ball bhall
Observe: A few of these varieties could also be hypothetical. Not each
attainable mutated type of each phrase really happens.

References[edit]

  • “ball” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th version, Edinburgh: Birlinn Restricted, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “ball”, in eDIL: Digital Dictionary of the Irish Language

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is lacking or incomplete. Please add to it, or talk about it on the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ball

  1. (slang) cool, hip, enjoyable, entertaining
    Det är ballt att åka skateboard.

    It’s cool to experience a skateboard.
    Synonym: cool

Declension[edit]

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